© Wrington thru the Lens 2017
ABOUT THE PROJECT  The project has been set up and is run by local volunteers who live in Wrington who have an interest and passion for local social and industrial history. Wrington Thru the Lens was launched at an exhibition on 30th April 2017 in the Wrington Memorial Hall during which several hundred residents enjoyed a display of 180 old historical photographs.  Visitors to the exhibition were also able to view an original copy of the Wrington Estate sale catalogue of 1895 which comprised 163 pages detailing the 6,000 acres that included twenty six farms and parts of the village of Wrington, Redhill and Burrington, which also included the Golden Lion Hotel and the Darlington Arms. Visitors were also encouraged to bring along photographs or other historical documents that we could scan during the event. Local volunteers will gather photographs, borrowed from private collections and publicly available material, as captured on camera and other illustrations, to build a collection that can be digitised. Other events planned, aim to stimulate awareness about the project and encourage residents of Wrington to come forward with photographs and historical documents, allowing us to scan them to create a digital archive. We’ll be undertaking this activity over next five years. In parallel to scanning and archiving activity volunteers will be researching stories associated with the collection to enable the creation of an e-book and eventually publish a hard copy containing many of the images and stories that have been discovered about Wrington’s social and industrial history. Our ambition is to complete this and publish a book about the project and the history revealed by the spring of 2022. The aim will then be to continue maintaining the digital archive, gathering more collections as they emerge and research stories associated using local volunteers. Wrington has a rich source of historical information. The large parish of Wrington in North Somerset is situated in country close to the river Yeo, and sheltered by the Mendip Hills. Written history of the manor of Wrington begins in 904 AD, when King Edward, the son of Alfred the Great, re-confirmed a grant of Wrington to Duke Ethelfrith. In about 946 AD an heir Duke Anthelstand became a monk and thus the manor passed within the jurisdiction of the Benedictine Abbots of Glastonbury. For the next 600 years, the Abbots of Glastonbury were lord of the manor, then followed Dissolution of the monasteries, and the grant of Wrington then passed to Sir Henry Capel, the family destined to become the Earls of Wessex. After succession of lords, the manorial property was sold and disposed of to various owners in 1895. After the invention of photography in the mid 1800’s, only a few wealthy and professional people in the area had access to the photographic equipment with studios for portrait work and field equipment for outdoor photography, which was slow and cumbersome. Hence only a few early photographs of Wrington exist. The introduction of the Kodak Brownie No 1 by George Eastman in 1900, selling for just $1, the ‘Box Brownie’ became the companion of many early amateur photographers, hence we see many more photographic and postcard collections emerge in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. The Wrington Estate sale catalogue of 1895 shows early photographs of Wrington at that time. Wrington Thru the Lens explores this late Victorian period up to present day, but will include historical links that may go much further back in time. For example Wrington Church, featured in the archive, was the birth place of Alice Carpenter, baptised in the church in 1590. Alice, at about the age of 32, sailed on the ‘Anne’ in 1623 three years after the Mayflower, to join the pilgrim fathers in America. Shortly after her arrival Alice married William Bradford who by then was Governor of the Colony.  Alice was the widow of Edward Southworth. She was one of five daughters of Alexander and Priscilla Carpenter of Wrington, the family having links with Leiden, Holland around 1600. Historical links such as this will also feature in the research and eventual digital archive of collections and published work.

THE TEAM

John Rubidge

Project Director

Email Rubidge7@aol.com.

Mark Bullen

Local Historian

© Wrington thru the Lens 2017
ABOUT THE PROJECT  The project has been set up and is run by local volunteers who live in Wrington who have an interest and passion for local social and industrial history. Wrington Thru the Lens was launched at an exhibition on 30th April 2017 in the Wrington Memorial Hall during which several hundred residents enjoyed a display of 180 old historical photographs.  Visitors to the exhibition were also able to view an original copy of the Wrington Estate sale catalogue of 1895 which comprised 163 pages detailing the 6,000 acres that included twenty six farms and parts of the village of Wrington, Redhill and Burrington, which also included the Golden Lion Hotel and the Darlington Arms. Visitors were also encouraged to bring along photographs or other historical documents that we could scan during the event. Local volunteers will gather photographs, borrowed from private collections and publicly available material, as captured on camera and other illustrations, to build a collection that can be digitised. Other events planned, aim to stimulate awareness about the project and encourage residents of Wrington to come forward with photographs and historical documents, allowing us to scan them to create a digital archive. We’ll be undertaking this activity over next five years. In parallel to scanning and archiving activity volunteers will be researching stories associated with the collection to enable the creation of an e-book and eventually publish a hard copy containing many of the images and stories that have been discovered about Wrington’s social and industrial history. Our ambition is to complete this and publish a book about the project and the history revealed by the spring of 2022. The aim will then be to continue maintaining the digital archive, gathering more collections as they emerge and research stories associated using local volunteers. Wrington has a rich source of historical information. The large parish of Wrington in North Somerset is situated in country close to the river Yeo, and sheltered by the Mendip Hills. Written history of the manor of Wrington begins in 904 AD, when King Edward, the son of Alfred the Great, re-confirmed a grant of Wrington to Duke Ethelfrith. In about 946 AD an heir Duke Anthelstand became a monk and thus the manor passed within the jurisdiction of the Benedictine Abbots of Glastonbury. For the next 600 years, the Abbots of Glastonbury were lord of the manor, then followed Dissolution of the monasteries, and the grant of Wrington then passed to Sir Henry Capel, the family destined to become the Earls of Wessex. After succession of lords, the manorial property was sold and disposed of to various owners in 1895. After the invention of photography in the mid 1800’s, only a few wealthy and professional people in the area had access to the photographic equipment with studios for portrait work and field equipment for outdoor photography, which was slow and cumbersome. Hence only a few early photographs of Wrington exist. The introduction of the Kodak Brownie No 1 by George Eastman in 1900, selling for just $1, the ‘Box Brownie’ became the companion of many early amateur photographers, hence we see many more photographic and postcard collections emerge in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. The Wrington Estate sale catalogue of 1895 shows early photographs of Wrington at that time. Wrington Thru the Lens explores this late Victorian period up to present day, but will include historical links that may go much further back in time. For example Wrington Church, featured in the archive, was the birth place of Alice Carpenter, baptised in the church in 1590. Alice, at about the age of 32, sailed on the ‘Anne’ in 1623 three years after the Mayflower, to join the pilgrim fathers in America. Shortly after her arrival Alice married William Bradford who by then was Governor of the Colony.  Alice was the widow of Edward Southworth. She was one of five daughters of Alexander and Priscilla Carpenter of Wrington, the family having links with Leiden, Holland around 1600. Historical links such as this will also feature in the research and eventual digital archive of collections and published work.

THE TEAM

John Rubidge

Project Director

Email Rubidge7@aol.com.

Mark Bullen

Local Historian